Now, That’s Nature: Post Oaks Plus

I thought you might enjoy some photos of massive post oaks I saw–Sue Ann

The Hermits' Rest

It has rained so much the past few days that it feels like I live at a mosquito farm. Everywhere I go I’ve been eaten up, though the barn swallows are trying to keep up with them at the ranch.

“Lake Travis” in Cameron. Photo by Martha Nethers.

Martha says that our old office on Travis is now located at “Lake Travis.” Birds love to bathe in it, but they can’t enjoy their lovely patio at the moment. (By the way, they recently saw a mother opossum and all her babies on her back–sure with I had a photo!)

Sink spider

The rains have also driven a lot of things indoors. A group of wolf spiders is hanging out in the kitchen of the old church building. I hope they scoot back out before the pest control dudes come!


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Remembering Wildflowers of Spring 2019

photos by Sherri Sweet

As the early spring wildflowers fade and the late spring riot of yellowness takes their place, we’d like to share some beautiful photos our member, Sherri Sweet, took. They will bring back some great memories!

A field of Indian Paintbrush north of Giddings on a country road.
RR 2323 northwest of Fredericksburg.
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Lexington Senior Butterfly Garden Update

photos by Sharon Sweet

Today, Sharon Sweet shares some photos of the butterfly garden project she and Wesley created five or six years ago at the senior center in Lexington, along with a bonus bluebonnet photo, because, well, who can resist those? We hope you enjoy this photo essay.

It has really grown in nicely.
The flowers really add a lot to the formerly bare wall.

This log is on the Willow City loop, outside of Fredericksburg.

Bluebonnets growing out of a log.

Amy in My Garden

by Donna Lewis

Spring is upon us. It’s March. So I have been spending the last six weeks getting the garden cleaned up, ready for the pollinators: raking leaves, trimming bushes, and pulling up dead plants so I can put the pollinator seeds in.

This year, I had an early visitor to the garden – “Amy” the nine-banded armadillo. Dasypus novemcinctusSomehow, she managed to get inside the garden fencing and the garden gates.

One of Amy’s kin. Photo from USDA.

Now, Amy didn’t just stroll around looking at my plants No, she decided to dig a little here and there.

Amy has been visiting the garden for about four weeks now. All of my efforts to persuade her to stay outside the garden and dig in the pasture have failed.

So, I ask the question, whose garden is it?

Continue reading “Amy in My Garden”